ryan hill reviews: spider-man homecoming

MaraRyan Hill Reviews0 Comments

There was a minute there when nobody cared about a Spider-Man movie anymore. After the disappointment of Spider-Man 3 in 2007, the series was rebooted in 2012 to mixed results, and that reboot was scuttled after only two films. It seemed Spider-Man could no longer do whatever a spider could. The character was so downtrodden, Spidey’s parent studio worked out a deal with Marvel to use the character in their cinematic universe.

Now, after all these years, Spider-Man is finally home with Spider-Man: Homecoming.

But does the world need a second reboot of Spider-Man, the sixth film featuring the web-slinger since 2001? In the hands of Marvel, the answer is hell yes.

Captain America: Civil War gave the world a glimpse at what Marvel could do with their most popular character. In short, they nailed Spider-Man. In the web-slinger’s limited screen time, Tom Holland portrayed the character with a perfect mix of wonder, amazement, and snark. The Tobey Maguire trilogy was good but mopey, the Andrew Garfield films were, eh, whatever, but Homecoming is everything that makes Spider-Man so great.

Homecoming ignores Spider-Man’s origin story but still focuses on Peter Parker/Spider-Man’s life in high school. He’s tormented by the bully Flash, crushing hard on his debate team colleague Liz, and wishing more than anything Tony Stark (Robert Downey Jr.) would make him a full-time Avenger.

But the fifteen-year-old Parker has bigger fish to fry outside the classroom, like stopping Vulture (Michael Keaton) from stealing weaponry left behind in the wake of battles fought by the Avengers.

Director Jon Watts, who made the Kevin Bacon indie Cop Car, also knows just how New York-centric Spider-Man is. Without the skyscrapers of that metropolis to swing from, Spidey is left to hitch rides on trains or run around, resulting in a great Ferris Bueller’s Day Off homage. It’s one of many nods to the great John Hughes, which Homecoming takes most of its cues from. The film is very much in the vein of a Hughes film, just with … you know … a guy running around in red tights shooting webs from his wrists.

Homecoming is one of the most fun blockbusters—comic book or otherwise—out there. It rivals Guardians of the Galaxy for sheer joy and is as good as, if not better than, Spider-Man 2, which is considered one of the best superhero films ever made. It even has a solid villain in Vulture, something the Marvel Cinematic Universe has been missing outside of Loki, who still hasn’t been fully utilized.

The key word for Homecoming is fun. By keeping the stakes lower—Spider-Man doesn’t have to save the world—the film avoids the underlying sadness of Ben Parker’s death, which anchored the original trilogy, and veers away from pretty much everything in the Amazing Spider-Man films. Marvel is free to embrace the Spider-Man character, relishing in Peter’s high school years, but without that pesky origin story.

It’s also one of the best Marvel films, and arguably the best Spider-Man film ever.

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