lessons learned from the gilmore girls

MaraTV0 Comments

While everyone else not living under a rock has been watching the revival Gilmore Girls: A Year in the Life, I’ve been busy playing catch up on the show. At this point, I’m living with that theme song in my head and practicing my witty comebacks on strangers I pass at the supermarket. But scaring the locals isn’t the only valuable thing I’ve taken away from Gilmore Girls. Here are a few keen insights I’ve learned from studying the quick-witted and coffee-fueled Gilmore ladies:

Coffee is life.

image from hercampus.com

image from hercampus.com

In case there was any question, there are three generations of Gilmore ladies ready to get into a verbal sparring match with you over the issue. I mean, can you imagine Rory balancing school, the Inn, extracurricular activities, all that reading, and not one but two boys without the aid of coffee? Or Lorelai managing the Inn, all the Luke’s Diner meals, business school, flirting with Luke and dating all the wrong men that aren’t Luke (I might be a Luke fan), parenting, all those quips, and her parents without the caffeine IV Luke supplies? I can barely manage half of that without my daily intake of java.

Dating is rough at any age.

image from zimbio.com

image from zimbio.com

As if watching the adolescent romantic troubles of Rory isn’t painful enough, watching Lorelai navigate her love life is almost more painful and wince-inducing. What’s great is how realistic it is. We watch Lorelai have her non-relationship with Luke, counting on him for everything and committing to nothing because he can really and truly hurt her. We watch Rory’s relationship with Dean quietly die, killed by adolescent romantic A.D.D. as her head is turned by Jess.

Cute can be a superpower.

image from gurl.com

image from gurl.com

Lorelai doesn’t even need to flip her hair to get what she wants. It helps that Luke is wrapped around her little pinky from Day One, but still. She makes cute look like a superpower and super easy at the same time. And they don’t hide how obnoxious that can be. There are two sides to every coin, my friends. Even superpowers can be annoying.

Parenting is rarely black and white.

image from bustle.com

image from bustle.com

With the backstory of Lorelai getting pregnant at sixteen and refusing to marry her baby-daddy Chris, it goes without saying that sometimes her parenting can be a little flawed. But what I find really refreshing is the portrayal of Chris. He loves Rory, even if he can’t exactly be the best and most consistent father. And instead of the normal angst, Lorelai and Rory accept this. They get mad at him at times, yes, but never portray him as the devil. Despite Lorelai’s rocky past with Chris, she continues to encourage Rory to have a relationship with him.

Sarcasm can be a second language.

image from http://asleeponelmstreet.tumblr.com/

image from http://asleeponelmstreet.tumblr.com/

Not that the Gilmores ever demonstrate this or anything. Sarcasm is definitely a second language in Stars Hollow, and pretty much everywhere. Again, something I kind of already knew since I speak it, but it’s great to see others speak it so fluently!

I understand the appeal of Sam Winchester now.

image from rebloggy.com

image from rebloggy.com

I’ve tried to understand what everyone sees in the Winchester boys, and the appeal has been a little lost on me. Until now. I’m a little angry with Rory and craving to see a grown up Dean Sam Jared Padalecki fighting the forces of evil.

Small towns can be fun.

image from zimbio.com

image from zimbio.com

Well, fictional ones anyway. I want to live somewhere with all-night dance contests and snowman-making contests and movies in the park! And is it just me, or are there like three bookstores in Stars Hollow?

What are your favorite parts of the Gilmore Girls world?

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